Ankeny, Iowa, May 11, 2017— Approximately one percent of Americans have celiac disease, a genetic autoimmune disease that damages the small intestine and reduces the rate of nutrient absorption from food.

To increase public awareness of the disease, Beyond Celiac (formerly the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness) sponsors Celiac Awareness Month in May. 

People with celiac disease are sensitive to gluten—found in grains such as barley, wheat and rye. Gluten triggers their symptoms and can affect the entire body, while avoiding gluten allows the small intestine to heal.

To aid in cooking and eating a gluten-free diet, The Soyfoods Council offers a free brochure, How to Eat and Live Gluten-Free! The Soyfoods Council provides information about the wide range of naturally gluten-free soyfoods that provide many of the same nutrients found in fortified breads and cereals that are on the do-not-eat list for those with celiac disease. For example, soybeans, tofu and soymilk provide calcium. Soy flour, TVP, tofu and soybeans provide iron and B-vitamins. Soy itself is a complete, plant-based protein that also supplies fiber.        

Soyfoods can make it easier to go gluten-free with simple ideas such as mixing soy flour with other gluten-free flours to create appealing baked goods. Find tips and guidelines in the brochure, How to Eat and Live Gluten-Free! It’s available on the Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com. Look for recipes such as Chicken and Noodle Toss made with gluten-free tofu shirataki noodles. The Soyfoods Council recipe database provides ideas for gluten-free snacks such as edamame, desserts like Gluten-Free Refrigerator Cookies made with soy flour, and Cool Chocolate Mousse featuring tofu, cocoa powder and Medjool dates. You can also keep current with the latest studies related to soyfoods and your health.

Try this Chicken and Noodle Toss recipe! 

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About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Ankeny, Iowa, May 4, 2017— Breakfast is becoming a more globally inspired adventure. As Technomic’s Breakfast Consumer Trend Report notes, 51% of Millennials are looking for more ethnic flavors at breakfast. Soyfoods offer ingredient authenticity, convenience and versatility as Asian-inspired morning meals continue to gather momentum. Options include a breakfast stir-fry made with tofu, miso broth-based breakfast soup, and savory Asian spins on breakfast classics, such as pancakes.

            Traditional Asian breakfasts include soyfoods such as miso soup, soymilk and tofu. Consider adding savory flavor notes to breakfast with soy sauce, miso and—for the more adventurous—natto. Natto is a fermented soybean food eaten at breakfast in Japan, often along with rice. It is appreciated for its healthful attributes, including protein and probiotics. Probiotics are naturally occurring live bacteria in cultured and fermented foods, and are good for the digestive system. Miso (fermented soybean paste) is another probiotic food traditionally consumed at breakfast; one Tablespoon provides approximately 2 grams of protein.

            Miso is made by combining cooked soybeans, sea salt, grains and a starter culture. The mixture is fermented for a few months up to a few years. The mildest form, white miso (shiro), is made with soybeans and rice. Yellow miso (shinshu) is made with fermented soybeans and barley and is fermented longer than white miso, adding a nutty flavor. Red miso (aka) offers the boldest and saltiest flavor, to complement meats and other robust foods.

            Here are some suggestions for elevating your breakfast experience by combining soyfoods and Asian flavors.

            Whip up a Tofu Smoothie: Create a Strawberry Tofu Smoothie in a blender: Combine one box of silken tofu, 2½ cups frozen strawberries and 2 cups orange juice. Blend until smooth. For other soy-based smoothie recipes such as the Berry Secret Smoothie (part of the secret is spinach), visit The Soyfoods Council website.

            Wake up to Rice Bowls: According to Datassential, 57% of consumers are interested in breakfast bowls. Traditional Japanese breakfasts feature savory flavors and often incorporate ingredients like rice, soy (tofu, tempeh, natto, miso soup), and eggs. Chinese inspirations include soymilk, and congee (rice porridge) served with seasonings and protein such as eggs, peanuts or seafood.

            Make Breakfast with Miso: Fermented flavors aren’t just for kimchee or pickles. Adding miso paste to hot water makes a great starting point for breakfast with miso soup or a simple hot beverage. Follow instructions provided on the miso container for the amount of miso to add to hot water. Choose from red, yellow or white miso. Add tofu or leftover vegetables and chicken if you wish.

            Sip Some Soymilk: Versatile soymilk makes a great chai soy latte, and vanilla soymilk creates a rich hot chocolate. Soymilk also is an ideal ingredient for smoothies made with bananas and fruit juice. Experiment with this cholesterol-free, plant-based milk when you make oatmeal or hot rice cereals.

            Rise and Shine with Tempeh and Tofu: Enjoy plant-based protein for breakfast or brunch with recipes such as Savory Tofu Pancakes with Cashew Sauce. The sauce, made in a blender, combines cashews, tamari sauce, lime juice, garlic cloves and water. You’ll find the complete recipe on The Soyfoods Council website. Indonesian-inspired recipes feature tempeh, a fermented soybean cake with a nutty flavor. Tempeh is high in protein, low in fat, and cholesterol-free. At breakfast, tempeh is sautéed and served with sambal kacang, a peanut sauce with chilies. Add a savory note to breakfast bowls with recipes from The Soyfoods Council, including Tempeh Bites with Curried Peanut Sauce.

            For other Asian-inspired and soy-rich breakfast ideas, as well as nutrition information for soyfoods, visit www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com. You’ll also find the latest studies related to soyfoods and your health.  

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About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Via the American Institute for Cancer Research:

Along with their many nutrients, soy foods contain proteins and isoflavones, compounds that have estrogen-like properties. High levels of estrogen can fuel some breast cancers, and these compounds are well studied for their link to cancer risk and survivorship. 

A new study now adds to this research, suggesting that consuming soy and other foods containing isoflavones after diagnosis may help some breast cancer survivors live longer. The link with more soy foods and lower mortality was found among women diagnosed with tumors that do not have receptors for estrogen. 

Read the full article  here.

In the news: Old Capitol Food Company

Three young Iowa City entrepreneurs hope to create a new market using one of the state’s biggest resources: soybeans. 

Read the full article in the Iowa-City Press-Citizen here.

Fat is back. Not that it ever really went away. Even when very low-fat diets were all the rage, experts recognized that certain fats were more harmful than others and some were even beneficial.

A common misperception is that omega-6 polyunsaturated fats, which are found in abundant amounts in most oils, including soybean oil, are pro-inflammatory. Meanwhile, it is thought that omega-3 polyunsaturated fats protect against inflammation. Chronic inflammation is believed to be a key process underlying many chronic diseases.

Back in the late 1970s, researchers suggested that the low incidence of  heart disease among the Inuit of Canada and Alaska was related to their fat intake.1 Specifically, this population eats a diet high in the omega-3 fatty acid eicosanoic acid from fish and low in the omega-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid which is found in other types of meat.

The findings put omega-3 fats in the spotlight, giving rise to the popularity of fish oil supplements. But evidence in support of the health benefits of omega-3 fat has never been as consistent as anticipated.  In fact, recent commentaries published in two distinguished medical journals reached completely opposite conclusions about the benefits of omega-3 fat supplementation.2,3

Likewise, the harmful effects of saturated fat have been brought into question recently. It is now recognized that while saturated fat raises LDL-cholesterol, it also increases LDL particle size; large LDLs are less atherogenic than small LDLs.4  Nevertheless, prospective epidemiologic studies clearly show that replacing saturated fat with omega-6 polyunsaturated fat reduces CHD risk and mortality.5,6  And in the end, it’s this relevant endpoint—heart disease—that matters.

While replacing saturated fat with complex carbohydrates also reduces risk, the beneficial effects are smaller compared to omega-6 fats. Which raises this question: If omega-6 fats increase inflammation why would replacing saturated fat with omega-6 fat reduce CHD risk? 

Part of the explanation is that omega-6 fats reduce serum LDL-cholesterol.  More importantly, despite the common perception, the proinflammatory effects of omega-6 fat aren’t very well established.  In fact, a systematic review of clinical trials published in 2012 concluded that there is “virtually no evidence” from clinical trials that linoleic acid, the main dietary omega-6 fat, increases concentrations of inflammatory markers in healthy people.7 

This finding may seem surprising since it is thought that in vivo, linoleic acid is converted into arachidonic acid, the omega-6 fat from which the alleged proinflammatory hormones (eicosanoids) are produced.  However, extensive clinical research shows that increasing linoleic acid intake has little effect on endogenous levels of arachidonic acid.8 Furthermore, not all of the eicosanoids produced from arachidonic acid are pro-inflammatory.9

These findings will hopefully change the way that different fats and oils are viewed in healthy diets. Until the dust settles, it’s clear that soybean oil is a choice that provides the best of all worlds, since it is rich in both omega-6 and omega-3 fats. While ideally most dietary fat should come from whole foods, added fats and oils can play important culinary roles.

~ Mark Messina, PhD, Executive Director, Soy Nutrition Institute

  1. Dyerberg, J., Bang, H.O., Stoffersen, E., Moncada, S., and Vane, J.R. Eicosapentaenoic acid and prevention of thrombosis and atherosclerosis? Lancet. 1978, 2, 117-9.

  2. Curfman, G. The unfulfilled promise of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. JAMA Intern Med. 2017,

  3. O’Keefe, J.H., Jacob, D., and Lavie, C.J. Omega-3 fatty acid therapy: The tide turns for a fish story. Mayo Clin Proc. 2017, 92, 1-3.

  4. Dreon, D.M., Fernstrom, H.A., Campos, H., Blanche, P., Williams, P.T., and Krauss, R.M. Change in dietary saturated fat intake is correlated with change in mass of large low-density-lipoprotein particles in men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998, 67, 828-36.

  5. Li, Y., Hruby, A., Bernstein, A.M., Ley, S.H., Wang, D.D., Chiuve, S.E., Sampson, L., Rexrode, K.M., Rimm, E.B., Willett, W.C., et al. Saturated fats compared with unsaturated fats and sources of carbohydrates in relation to risk of coronary heart disease: A prospective cohort study. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2015, 66, 1538-48.

  6. Wang, D.D., Li, Y., Chiuve, S.E., Stampfer, M.J., Manson, J.E., Rimm, E.B., Willett, W.C., and Hu, F.B. Association of specific dietary fats with total and cause-specific mortality. JAMA Intern Med. 2016, 176, 1134-45.

  7. Johnson, G.H. and Fritsche, K. Effect of dietary linoleic acid on markers of inflammation in healthy persons: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012, 112, 1029-1041.

  8. Rett, B.S. and Whelan, J. Increasing dietary linoleic acid does not increase tissue arachidonic acid content in adults consuming Western-type diets: a systematic review. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2011, 8, 36.

  9. Fritsche, K.L. Too much linoleic acid promotes inflammation-doesn’t it? Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2008, 79, 173-5.

August 16, 2016 – West Des Moines, IA – Fried food wasn’t the only foodie favorite at the 2016 Iowa State Fair. On Monday, hundreds of fair-goers sampled original soft silken tofu-based salad dressing creations from four local, professional chefs including this year’s champion Chef Alex Strauss from Hy-Vee Market Café. The competition, which was hosted by The Soyfoods Council and the Iowa Restaurant Association, took place in the Agriculture Building where crowds watched each chef make and discuss their dressings in front of a panel of professional judges.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Chefs Wow the Crowd

The competing chefs were challenged to make salad dressing recipes which used Mori-nu Soft Silken Tofu as the base of the dressing, were consumer friendly, and were delicious enough to put on a restaurant menu. Each chef demonstrated the process of making the dressing and then served six judges as well as a crowd of fair-goers.

Strauss Wins

Chef Strauss took home the gold with a sweet and spicy Creamy Mango Habanero dressing over a mixed local greens salad with avocados, hearts of palm, red peppers and Jamaican jerk pork. Other competing chefs included:

2nd Place: Chef Kerri Rush, Fresh Café & Market, Clive – Avotziki Salad dressing

3rd Place: Chef Hassan Atarmal, Fresh Mediterranean Express, Waukee -Tofu Soy Ginger dressing

4th Place: Chef Patrick Cashman, Guru BBQ, Des Moines – Tofu Roasted Raspberry Chipotle dressing

All participants received cash prizes.

Contest judges included Tom and Susanne Oswald of the Iowa Soybean Association, Angela Ten Clay, a Communication Manager for Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield’s Blue Zones Project, Table 128 Bistro + Bar Owners/Operators Chef Lynn and Sarah Pritchard, and 2015 Soy Salad Dressing Competition Champion Chef Scott Stroud from College Chefs.

All of the chefs’ recipes are available online at both the Iowa Restaurant Association and The Soyfoods Council websites: www.restaurantiowa.com and www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.

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The Soyfoods Council

The Soyfoods Council is an affiliate of the Iowa Soybean Association. The mission of The Soyfoods Council is to serve as a catalyst, leader and facilitator to mainstream soy-based foods into the global marketplace-America and beyond. www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com

 

Iowa Restaurant Association

The Iowa Restaurant Association is an advocacy organization supporting Iowa’s industry with educational and promotional programs across the state. www.restraurantiowa.com

 

Media Contact:

Linda Funk

515-491-8636

lfunk@thesoyfoodscouncil.com

Ankeny, Iowa, June 7, 2016— A study from Shanghai involving more than 70,000 healthy women shows that consuming soyfoods reduces risk of breast cancer. The study is good news for Western women and girls because they, too, can derive health benefits and reduce their risk of breast cancer by starting to incorporate higher amounts of soyfoods into their diets.

After following 70,000 study participants for more than 13 years, the Shanghai study found that 1,034 participants developed breast cancer. Here are some details from the study.

  • Consuming approximately one-and-a-half servings of soyfoods per day during adolescence was associated with a nearly 50 percent lower risk of developing breast cancer before menopause.

  • Consuming approximately two servings of soyfoods per day during adulthood was associated with a one-third reduction in the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.

  • Consuming soyfoods early in life was not protective against breast cancer after menopause. The investigators who conducted the study reasoned that the protective effects of consuming soy early in life are fully present during the premenopausal period, so there is no further protection against breast cancer after menopause.

The study from Shanghai is relevant for American women—whose diets have not traditionally included soy— because adult soy intake was protective against breast cancer only among women who consumed little soy when they were young. By doing so now, women can reduce their risk of breast cancer. Also, young girls who consume soy will significantly reduce their risk later in life. Current U.S. breast cancer statistics show that about one in eight American women will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.

The Soyfoods Council reminds you that one serving of soyfoods—including soymilk and edamame—provides approximately 7 to 15 grams of high-quality plant-based protein. Unlike many commonly consumed protein-rich foods, soyfoods are also cholesterol-free and low in saturated fat.   

Download Soyfoods and Your Health here.            

For more information about current research studies about soyfoods and your health, visit the Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com. The Soyfoods Council offers easy-to-understand health and nutrition information, plus cooking tips and recipes featuring soyfoods. You’ll also find a wide variety of kid-pleasing snacks. 

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

The Soyfoods Council’s executive director Linda Funk was recently on AgweekTV sharing important information on how to get heart healthy protein (soyfoods!) in your diet. Watch it here

Ankeny, Iowa, January 12, 2016— If you have trouble sleeping, or suffer from insomnia, you may want to add soyfoods to your daily diet. New results from the first population study to examine the relationship between soy and sleep habits indicates that soyfoods offer striking benefits. Soyfoods are uniquely rich sources of isoflavones, which are naturally occurring compounds classified as plant estrogens. The hormone estrogen tends to promote better sleep, both in terms of quality and duration.

A recent population study involving over 1,000 Japanese adults interviewed each participant to determine the amount of soy and isoflavones consumed and answered questions about how long and how well they slept. Among the group of participants, 13 percent reported regular sleep duration (7 to 8 hours a day) and 56 percent reported sufficient sleep quality. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, individuals in the group with the highest soy intake were almost twice as likely to sleep at least 7 to 8 hours, and about twice as likely to have better sleep quality. Those in the highest intake group consumed about two servings of soyfoods per day.

This study is good news for the millions of Americans who suffer from insomnia. According to survey data from the National Sleep Foundation, 48 percent of Americans say they have occasional insomnia, while 22 percent experience insomnia. Getting a good night’s sleep is a vital component of overall good health and can aid in maintaining a healthy weight. Sleep-deprived people tend to snack more at night, and also may crave higher-carbohydrate foods and larger portions.

In the U.S., popular soyfoods include tofu, soymik and edamame. The Soyfoods Council offers tips and ideas for enjoyable ways to consume soy. On its website, you’ll also find easy recipes for incorporating more soyfoods into your diet. Beverage ideas include the berry-rich Silken Shake made with firm silken tofu, fresh or frozen strawberries, cranberry juice, vanilla and the sweetener of your choice. Another soy-based drink, the Pomegranate Cherry Vanilla Shake, features vanilla soymilk, pomegranate juice and frozen dark sweet cherries. For the latest health, research and nutrition information about soyfoods, visit the Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.

 

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About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

 

Looking for a healthy soy recipe? Try this Pomegranate-Cherry Vanilla Soy Smoothie.

Dr. Mark Messina on soy foods and breast cancer prevention on KICD 1240 AM:

Listen here.

The Iowa State Fair is right around the corner and the Iowa Soybean Association will insure that fairgoers have fun while learning about agriculture and the role soybean farmers play in helping feed and fuel Iowa, the nation and world.

The association, based in Ankeny and committed to improving the competitiveness of Iowa’s 37,000 soybean farmers, is partnering with the fair and other organizations to bring some old favorites and a few new events to the list of must-see stops:

Biodiesel powering the trams — It’s easy and safe for fairgoers to get from one end of the grounds to the other thanks to the ISA sponsorship of not only the tram tractors and carts, but also the biodiesel that fuels this popular transportation.

Ag magic at your fingertips —Spectators will delight at Rhonda Renee’s Thank A Farmer show featuring storytelling, juggling and music. Renee’s performance illustrates that nearly everything we touch, consume and wear has a direct connection to agriculture and a farmer. Thirty-minute shows will be held each day in the Christensen Farms Animal Learning Center at 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 1 p.m., and 4 p.m. Also in the Animal Learning Center,visitors can see livestock that eat Iowa grown soybeans and check out the ‘Soy- House’ to learn more about all the household products made from soy.

Focus on water — Visitors to the Ag Building can see firsthand how Iowa farmers are committed to clean water. Meander through Farmville, learn about the many conservation practices being used to protect soil and water quality and sign up to win a patio set and grill package. ISA representatives will be on hand Aug. 13 and 20.

Beat the heat, watch a free movie —”FARMLAND” follows the lives of farmers exploring the risks and rewards associated with farming and the passion that is passed down from generation to generation. It will be shown in the Maytag Family Theaters 1 p.m. daily with a farmer panel immediately following the featured presentation. Admission is free.

Be conversational about conservation — Iowa soybean farmers excelling in environmental stewardship will be recognized Aug. 19 at the Iowa Farm Environmental Leader Award ceremony to be held at the Penningroth Center beginning at 9 a.m.

Planting seeds of farming knowledge — Fun for children of all ages, Little Hands on Farm located just north of the Animal Learning Center is a place for children to learn how food is grown by participating in a variety of hands-on activities. They can also package soybeans to help feed Iowa’s pork and poultry industries.

Eat and enjoy —The Soyfoods Council will present two chances to experience soyfoods at the fair on Aug. 17. The Annual Soy Salad Dressing Professional Chef Contest (sponsored by Morinaga) will be held 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Ag Building — stop by to test the chef’s creations! The second opportunity is a cooking demonstration and soyfoods contest judging at 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. in the Elwell Building.

 

 

 

 

Iowa Food & Family Project exhibit – Again this year, the ISA is partnering with the Iowa Food & Family Project to feed people’s curiosity about how food is grown and the dedicated farmers who grow it. The must-see exhibit is open 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. daily in the southeast atrium of the Varied Industries Building and will feature a must-see sculpture created from more than 50 tons of sand. Win Casey’s pizza for a year, grab your copy of the Iowa Food & Family Cookbook and test your knowledge of agriculture to win great prizes!

To learn more about ISA, go to www.iasoybeans.com.

Ankeny, Iowa, June 23,, 2015— A recent statistical analysis of the scientific literature concluded that in patients with kidney disease but not yet on dialysis, soy protein consumption leads to favorable changes in several health outcomes related to kidney function. In addition, soy helps to improve general nutritional status in patients on dialysis. Published in April 2015 in the European journal Clinical Nutrition, the analysis included 12 clinical trials on the effects of soy protein containing isoflavones in patients with chronic kidney disease.

Plant foods such as soybeans are rich in bio-active compounds called phytochemicals. Phytochemicals, such as isoflavones, are thought to have important health benefits, especially in relation to providing protection against chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease. In fact, more than 25 years ago the U.S. National Cancer Institute began intensely investigating isoflavones for their role in preventing cancer. Since then, isoflavones have been studied for a wide range of health benefits, including kidney function. Soybeans are essentially the only commonly consumed food that contains meaningful amounts of isoflavones.

According to Mark Messina Ph.D., executive director of the Soy Nutrition Institute, “Soy protein appears to place less stress on the kidneys in comparison to other proteins and lowers serum creatinine and phosphorous levels. In patients with kidney disease, serum phosphorus levels are often elevated, which can lead to an assortment of problems. That soy protein decreases phosphorus levels indicates that patients with kidney disease can benefit by consuming soyfoods.” This is good news for an increasing number of Americans because the prevalence of kidney disease is on the rise. It is one of the main complications of diabetes, the incidence of which is increasing because of the US obesity epidemic.

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About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

 

Media Contact:

Linda Funk

Executive Director

The Soyfoods Council

515-491-8636

lfunk@thesoyfoodscouncil.com

Soyfoods protective against gout
Gout is estimated to affect about 5% of the middle-aged and elderly population worldwide. In the United States, the “disease of kings” as it is called affects about eight million American adults. Gout is a type of inflammatory arthritis which leads to substantial morbidity by causing severe pain in the joints. New research from Singapore involving over 50,000 study participants found that higher protein intake increased risk by more than 25%. However, eating legumes in general and soyfoods in particular lowered risk by nearly 20%.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25808549

Soy protein helpful to those with Crohn’s disease
Crohn’s disease (CD) is an inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown cause. CD most commonly affects the end of the small bowel (the ileum) and the beginning of the colon, but it may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus. This disease affects an estimated 700,000 Americans. In recent years, malnutrition associated with active CD has been reduced although obesity has increased. Brazilian researchers have found that adding 22 grams of soy protein to daily diets decreased body fat and increased muscle in people with CD. These beneficial changes in body composition can greatly help those suffering from this disease.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25795947

 

Soy protective against breast cancer
About 1 in 8 U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime and in 2014, an estimated 232,670 new cases of invasive breast cancer were expected to have been diagnosed in American women. A recent statistical analysis of population studies which included over 20,000 women found that diet greatly impacts risk of getting breast cancer. Most importantly, eating higher amounts of soyfoods – about two servings per day – was associated with a one-third lower risk of developing breast cancer. Eating vegetables was also protective but less so than for soy. Conversely, higher-fat diets increased risk about 15%.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25784976

 

Soy formula use leads to normal growth and development
Soy infant formula has been widely used for more than 5 decades. However, in recent years soy formula has become somewhat controversial because it is contains naturally-occurring chemicals called isoflavones. New data from the Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center is reassuring. When comparing children at age 5 who were breast-fed or fed milk-based or soy-based formula during infancy, they found the size and structural characteristics of hormonally-sensitive reproductive organs did not differ.   The uterus and ovaries were assessed in girls and the prostate and testes in boys.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25761499

Clues to the mechanism by which soy protein lowers cholesterol
The US FDA formally recognized the cholesterol-lowering effects of soy protein in 1999 and just this year, Health Canada did likewise. And yet, no mechanism by which soy protein lowers blood cholesterol has been definitively identified. New research from Italy does offer a possible explanation, however. Italian investigators found that small chains of amino acids (building blocks of protein) resulting from the digestion of soy protein inhibit in liver cells the enzyme primarily responsible for synthesizing cholesterol.

Source: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleListURL&_method=list&_ArticleListID=-765217295&_sort=r&_st=13&view=c&md5=41e1942552efecc0ac4a8e9552d11636&searchtype=a

For Women with Breast Cancer, Soy Isoflavones Lower Bone Density but Improve Survival

New research from China suggests that in women with breast cancer, soyfoods have anti-estrogenic effects. The results come from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study. While the hormone estrogen protects bone health, women who ate the most soy in this study had lower bone mineral density. Not surprisingly, they also were less likely to have a recurrence of their cancer and they had better survival rates. These outcomes are both the opposite of those associated with the hormone estrogen. Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25687481

New Rating System Confirms Quality of Soy Protein

Current methods for evaluating protein quality show that soy protein is higher in quality than any other plant protein and, in fact, is similar to animal protein. Recently, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has discussed the need to adopt a new and more accurate method for evaluating proteins. So how does soy fare with this new method? Research from New Zealand shows the quality of soy protein holds up when using this method and is still much higher than other plant proteins like the protein from kidney beans, rice, peas and peanuts. Source: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/145/2/372.abstract?sid=afe04888-53ef-4b26-999b-431b6fb8e7a5

Soyfoods and the 2015 Dietary Guidelines

The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) has released a new report to guide food habits of Americans. According to the DCAC, a healthy dietary pattern is one that is higher in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low- or non-fat dairy, seafood, legumes, and nuts while limiting red and processed meat, refined grains, sugar-sweetened foods and drinks. This healthy pattern is low in saturated fat, added sugars, and sodium. Foods made from soybeans are low in saturated fat and, because of their high quality protein, are a perfect replacement for meat in menus. These foods are a perfect fit in the diets recommended by the DGAC. Source: http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/02-executive-summary.asp

Hot Flashes Can Last for Years

Up to 80% of women experience hot flashes during menopause. But even after women transition through the menopause years, hot flashes can continue. A study of nearly 1,500 US women found that on average, women had hot flashes for about 7½ years. Women who start having hot flashes earlier are likely to have them for longer. Those who had hot flashes starting before menopause had them for an average of 11 years or longer compared to about 3½ years for those who started having hot flashes during menopause. Fortunately, for many women there is a way to combat hot flashes. Research shows that the isoflavones in soybeans reduce both the frequency and severity of hot flashes: (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22433977). Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25686030

Soy Lowers Blood Pressure and Cools Hot Flashes

Postmenopausal women who eat soyfoods may get a dual benefit. In a recent study, eating biscuits made with soy flour resulted in lower blood pressure and fewer hot flashes among a group of older women. The women ate two biscuits per day providing 33 grams of soy protein and about 50 milligrams of isoflavones. Source: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2013.875434#.VOsW2C4Xei8

Soybean oil can help boost vitamin E intake, soyfoods can boost potassium intake, two shortfall nutrients

Many Americans don’t get enough vitamin E or potassium according to the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. The committee characterized these as shortfall nutrients. Soyfoods can help consumers meet needs for both. Soy oil is an important source of vitamin E while many foods made from soybeans are rich in potassium. Source: http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/02-executive-summary.asp

Ankeny, Iowa, July 25, 2017— Most Americans know that blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart attacks and stroke, but few are aware that soy protein may have blood pressure-lowering effects that can be added to the list of health benefits of eating soyfoods.

            For two decades, health agencies around the world have acknowledged that soy protein directly lowers blood cholesterol levels and can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Now, recently published research suggests that soy protein also lowers blood pressure. A new statistical analysis of 12 clinical trials involving more than 1,500 postmenopausal women found that soy protein significantly lowered systolic blood pressure by slightly more than 3 points (mmHg) and diastolic blood pressure by about 1 point.

            Researchers also found that women in the study who ate at lest 25 grams of soy protein per day experienced a decrease of nearly 5 points in their systolic blood pressure and nearly 2 points in their diastolic blood pressure. Soy protein is available in a variety of soyfoods.

 

For example, one-half cup of water-packed tofu provides 12.5 grams of protein; 1 cup of soymilk offers approximately 7 grams of protein. Reducing blood pressure by the amounts found in the research analysis could potentially reduce the risk of developing coronary heart disease and stroke by as much as 10 percent. The cholesterol-lowering effects of soy protein provide additional protection.

 

Jade Hummus with Pita Crisps

            The Soyfoods Council offers crave-worthy recipe ideas for incorporating soyfoods into your diet. Versatile ingredients such as tofu, soymilk, edamame and tempeh can enhance your favorite recipes or offer snacking opportunities that add soy protein. Jade Hummus, for instance, is made in a food processor or blender. It combines cooked shelled edamame (blanched and frozen fresh soybeans), tahini (sesame seed paste), extra virgin olive oil, fresh parsley, garlic, lemon juice and seasonings such as cumin, paprika and ground coriander seeds. Serve this soy hummus with pita bread.

 

For a simple but soy-rich Spiced Fruit Dip, blend together soft tofu, brown sugar and ground cinnamon.

            For more health-related information about soyfoods, cooking tips and soy recipe ideas, visit The Soyfoods Council website: www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.

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About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties. 

 

Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

LET’S STRETCH

HYBRID INGREDIENTS AND PROTEIN ENHANCERS CAN EXPAND YOUR MENU IN CREATIVE WAYS. BY ROB BENES –

Pretty much everyone in the food world is on the lookout for new foods and flavors and on a quest to find new adventures in dining. It’s natural to want to explore the outer limits of the familiar and dabble in the unknown. And for the past few years, hybrid foods, such as cronuts, ramen noodle burgers and cragels, have been exciting palates.

But rather than combining foods for a hybrid recipe, there are hybrid ingredients—fruits and vegetables—and fat-reducing protein enhancers to unveil improved recipes, new flavors and an abundance of creative pairings. 

get educated

The best way to approach new ingredients is to think simple. You want the vegetable or fruit to shine in its natural color and flavor. You may or may not want protein enhancers to be noticed. Cost depends on the item and its seasonality, but most fruits and vegetables tend to be mid-range and not overly priced. They can be ordered through purveyors, or local farmers might be growing them. Traditional fruits and vegetables are easier to work with, because there’s a preconceived sense of how they taste.

“Your mind can get around the hybrids,” says John Eisenhart, executive chef at Pazzo Ristorante,

Portland, Ore., “but they need to be tasted so that an educated guess can be made as to what to do with them.”

Some hybrid items can have a high water content, which makes them fragile and likely to fall apart under high temperatures or long cooking times. This will result in loss of flavor and texture, as well as appearance. “Determining the water content will give you further direction on what approach should be taken,” Eisenhart says.

Protein enhancers—mushrooms and textured soy protein (TSP)—are primarily mixed with ground meats to raise protein levels, reduce fat and allow for another layer of flavor with the use of amino acids. TSP comes in flour, dried flakes and chunks. Replacing a portion of the ground meats in recipes (25%-50%) with hydrated TSP retains all the meat’s flavor without adding fat, cholesterol or sodium, according to The Soyfoods Council, Ankeny, Iowa.

Mushrooms and TSP also can stretch the budget—and ground meats—without sacrificing flavor or texture. 

Fruit - Names of hybrid fruits, such as mandarinquat and lemato, sound like something from The Wizard of Oz. Eisenhart steams peeled lematos and combines with roasted garlic and soaked bread to make a salsa rosa for seafood dishes. The fruit, a cross between a lemon and a tomato with hints of lemon grass, rose and geranium, works well with fish because it’s sweet and offsets the iodine flavor of some seafood and shellfish. “People think it’s tomato sauce until they taste it and discover a pleasing flavor,” Eisenhart says.

The mandarinquat, which Eisenhart uses in ceviches, is a hybrid of mandarin orange and kumquat. Like a kumquat, it can be eaten whole, peel and all, although mandarinquats are larger, with crunchier skin, and tend to have many small seeds. Raw, they can be eaten as a snack, sliced in salads or paired with cheese. Cooked, they go in sauces, purees and preserves.

“I like to leave these ingredients fairly unadulterated, so guest can actually appreciate them,” Eisenhart says.

Brandon Felder, executive chef at Le Foret, New Orleans, makes an heirloom tomato salad that includes lemato, compressed watermelon, cucumber/watermelon sorbet and lump crabmeat with a watermelon vinaigrette. When he makes a tomato salad, he uses a lemon olive oil to preseason the tomatoes, but when using the lemato, he can skip that step. “The extra and complex flavor profile allows you to not do much other than present the food,” he says. 

Vegetables - “Chefs are looking for more opportunities with plant-based items and cuisine, especially when they can deliver an appetizer or entree that includes a protein,” says Andrew Hunter, research and development chef, author and R&D mentor on Lifetime’s “Supermarket Superstar.”

Hunter has been working with Coastline Family Farms, Salinas, Calif., developing the soon- to-be-released Burgundy Nutraleaf Lettuce. Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J., created the lettuce through natural breeding processes (not GMO), using regular red lettuces as parent stock. It’s a nutrient-dense food with high levels of antioxidants, particularly the polyphenols family.

The lettuce is juiced with blueberries for a superantioxidant rush, or with pink lady apples to provide a sweet and tart contrast for smoothies or shots. To help with drinkability and more sweetness, blueberry juice, apple juice or a high pH water is added. “The juicing of the lettuce provides the green herbaceous notes that kale, chard or collard greens give without the bitter- ness,” Hunter says.

Over the years, there have been a number of sushi roll preparations that switch out nori with different kinds of sushi sheets. The lettuce is easy to work with in rolls while adding great color and boosting nutritional value. “It’s a nice way to utilize the lettuce in an unexpected way, because everyone expects to see lettuce in salads,” Hunter says. “Plus, it’s a great substitute for those people who do not like the nori flavor.”

He makes an inside-out sushi roll with rice on the outside—known as uramaki—with the lettuce inside. He first cuts the lettuce to the desired size and lays it down on a rolling mat. Next, sticky rice is spread on top of the lettuce. He adds pickled vegetables and avocado, rolls it, rerolls in sesame seeds and cuts into bite-size pieces.

At Yale University, New Haven, Conn., Yale Dining’s flavor strategy is called Farm the Flavors. “It’s the chef’s responsibility to maximize and enhance the flavor of produce through culinary technique, appropriate seasoning and appetizing food combinations,” explains Ron DeSantis, CMC, director of culinary excellence. “Chefs working with new breeds of produce need to ensure that the integrity of the produce is not compromised.”

For example, one of the quality characteristics of broccoflower, a cross between broccoli and cauliflower, is its appearance. “If it was pureed into a soup, the impact of the integrity and unique appearance is lost,” DeSantis says. “The preparation method of new vegetable breeds must complement the vegetable.”

Palate history and remembering classic combinations of flavors also is important when using new items. Eisenhart uses rabbage, a hybrid of radish and cabbage, to make kimchee. He follows a basic kimchee recipe calling for Napa cabbage and daikon radish, but uses rabbage, instead. 

Textured Soy Protein - TSP is generally added to ground beef and pork recipes, because it complements those flavors best and is not noticed. “People want to eat healthier without sacrificing flavor and texture,” says Dave Jensen, CCC, executive chef, Hy-Vee, Urbandale, Iowa. “TSP is one item that can enhance proteins while reducing fat content and still allowing flavor to be retained.”

He uses TSP in meatloaf in a ratio of two parts meat to one part flakes, increasing the use of liquid (broth, amino acids or soy) to rehydrate the flakes. TSP flour also can be used as a binding agent to reduce the amount of breadcrumbs or eggs.

DeSantis uses textured soy crumbles for vegan pasta dishes, vegan quesadillas and chicken piccata recipes. 

mushrooms

The University of Massachusetts (UMass), Amherst, partnered with the Mushroom Council, San Jose, Calif., earlier this year to create Mushroom Mania Week to promote the health benefits of mushrooms and showcase a variety of options for using them. Recipes were developed to reduce or eliminate saturated fat from standard menu items. A prime example was a beef empanada. Instead of using ground beef, a sauteed portabello mushroom filling was substituted to eliminate saturated fat, enhance flavor and transform a traditional street food from a meat-based recipe to a vegetarian favorite.

“Mushrooms are some of the most flavorful foods, and are extremely healthy,” says Anthony Jung, CEC, chef at Hampshire Dining Commons, UMass Dining. “They are low in calories and high in vitamin B and umami.” 

Jung also prepares wild mushroom risotto, Jamaican mushroom lettuce cups and grilled mushroom panini with Swiss cheese.

Over the past three years, Yale Dining and the Mushroom Council collaboratively developed new solutions for increasing flavor profiles and enhancement of familiar foods. They worked with one of the country’s largest mushroom producers to develop a ready-to-use mushroom duxelles that is stable in flavor and consistency. This allows Yale Dining chefs to focus on season- ing and proper cooking procedures for beef and turkey burgers and meatloaf.

“The umami delivered by the duxelles enhances the flavor of the meats, and 33% less meat is needed when preparing the burger or meatloaf when using the duxelles,” DeSantis says. “When eating the duxelles-enhanced burger, people experience a moist burger with familiar texture and a delicious beef flavor. It just happens to have mushroom duxelles as an ingredient.” 

Using the same ratio of meat and duxelles, Yale Dining also prepares turkey burger Florentine; sweet potato, quinoa and mushroom burger with tomato chutney; slow-roasted flank steak; and chili.

“One thing we are not attempting to do is take anything away, or make it cheaper. The goal is food quality,” DeSantis says. “The duxelles result in a flavorful and juicy finished food.”

Hampshire Dining Commons, an all-you-care-to-eat dining operation, has been using a ratio of 30% button shiitake mush- rooms to beef in beef-blend sliders. The mushrooms, coarsely chopped with a touch of salt and pepper, with some added chopped parsley, are used as the binding agent.

“Our customers like the rich and meaty flavors of mushrooms,” says Ken Toong, executive director of auxiliary enterprises, UMass Amherst. “We tried a 50% ratio, but the patties turn brown too quickly unless you serve them immediately.” 

Let’s Stretch: Hybrid ingredients and protein enhancers can expand your menu in creative ways by Rob Benes is Reprinted from The National Culinary Review, July/August 2014, Vol. 38, #7 ©2014 The American Culinary Federation, Inc. All rights reserved.

“What we as chefs and operators choose to offer as a plate of food has enormous consequences, for the health of our customers and our planet,” says CIA president Tim Ryan.

That message reflects a growing mindset among culinary and health experts who say Americans need to move away from the traditional Western-style diet based on the consumption of large portions of animal-based protein. And, observes Adam Busby, the CIA’s director of special culinary projects and a conference presenter, “It starts with recognizing that getting enough protein for most people in the United States is not a problem. People here eat enough.”

In fact, a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted in 2007-2008 found Americans consume more than twice the recommended daily protein allowance as suggested by national dietary guidelines.

What is more problematic, Busby notes, is that the demand for animal-based protein is expanding as the Western diet spreads in popularity around the globe. “As the planet’s population grows, eventually we’re going to run out of corn and soy used to feed these animals,” he says.

At the same time, livestock production creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas that many say contributes to global warming.

However, Busby says, “If we switch our protein focus to plant-based — even slowly — we believe we could produce enough protein to support all future protein needs.”

In addition to negatively impacting the burgeoning movement toward sustainability, our tendency to consume large portions of red meat can affect the population’s health. “We’re overdoing it on meat and cholesterol,” says Neil Doherty, Sysco’s senior director of culinary development. “And that can lead to heart disease and diabetes.”

Proponents of a less meat-heavy diet urge a greater use of plant-based proteins that are nutrient-dense. Among the foods they cite are vegetables like avocado, spinach and kale; legumes such as soybeans, garbanzo beans, lentils and kidney beans; nuts and seeds like cashews, sesame seeds, pistachios and almonds; and grains like quinoa, amaranth and oatmeal.

This is an excerpt from Plant-based protein moves into the spotlight in Sysco Shape July 2014. Read the rest of the article here.

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