Ankeny, Iowa, May 28, 2019 — Whether you’re thinking about Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month in June, or new ways to freshen up your diet with plant protein, summer is the season to see soyfoods in a whole new light.

 

Soyfoods such as edamame make it easier to create complete meals that fit in with busy lifestyles.

For picnics and casual entertaining, simply add edamame (fresh green soybeans) to classic summer dishes like three bean salad and chilled pasta salads.

Edamame is high in protein and fiber, and contains no cholesterol. In fact, one cup of shelled edamame provides 18 grams of high quality protein. Purchase frozen edamame either shelled or in the pod. You can also experiment with the many new products featuring edamame. Choices range from edamame hummus to Asian specialties like spring rolls, as well as gluten-free edamame pasta. Here are several seasonal ideas for creating new summer favorites with edamame.

Edamame, Dried Cranberry and Feta Salad: Toss thawed frozen, shelled edamame with dried cranberries, fresh basil and crumbled feta with a drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkling of black pepper for an easy salad. Add fresh berries if desired.

Edamame and Corn Salad on Mixed Lettuces: For a burst of summery flavors, combine sweet corn kernels and shelled edamame with diced red onion, Roma tomatoes, peeled cucumber, and minced garlic. Serve the salad on chopped romaine and iceberg lettuce, and dress with red wine vinaigrette.

Italian Pasta Salad with Edamame: This simple pasta salad is like a walk through the garden, made with corkscrew pasta and prepared Italian dressing. Add edamame, shredded carrots, broccoli, zucchini, halved cherry tomatoes, red bell pepper and red onion.

For details about these and other soy-rich recipes to simplify your summer, visit www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com. You’ll also find cooking tips and the latest research on soyfoods and health.

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Ankeny, Iowa, April 22, 2019 — May is National Salad Month, but salad season extends into late spring, full summer and the fall harvest season. When you’re entertaining, you know it’s likely you’ll be preparing food for omnivores as well as flexitarians (those who gravitate to vegetarian diets but occasionally eat fish or meat). To make your life easier, remember that soy ingredients—versatile plant proteins with healthy fats and no cholesterol—provide something for everybody.

This salad season, the Soyfoods Council offers a selection of crowd-pleasing ideas. Protein-rich ingredients such as tofu and tempeh can be combined with meats, seafood or chicken, while edamame can add fresh, colorful protein to seasonal salads.

To make salads with wide appeal, start with soyfood-based ideas that can be customized. Depending on preferences, you can add meat, seafood or dairy ingredients to the basic salad. Here are some examples that will appeal to flexitarians and omnivores alike.

1. Edamame and Walnut Salad is a colorful plant protein combination that pairs well with grilled pork or beef.  Salad ingredients include shelled cooked edamame, toasted walnut halves, and peeled, sectioned oranges. The dressing combines Dijon mustard, extra virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and a bit of brown sugar and black pepper.

2. Edamame Salad with Tofu Croutons and Raspberry Vinaigrette is an excellent base for salads with chicken. For those who choose to stick with plant protein, this salad offers a double-whammy of soy protein, along with soybean oil—another heart healthy ingredient—in the dressing.  In 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration formally recognized the cholesterol-lowering properties of soybean oil.

To make tofu croutons you’ll need cubes of water-packed extra-firm tofu, soy sauce, water, and 2 Tablespoons of ranch dressing seasoning mix. The croutons are first marinated in the seasonings, then dipped in soybean oil and tossed with cornstarch before frying. You can make them in an air fryer without having to add additional oil. Tofu croutons can also dress up Caesar Salads.

3. Creamy Miso Slaw with Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna is a blend of Asian flavors. Soyfoods meet seafood in this salad that’s bursting with cruciferous vegetables. Enjoy the slaw alone, or add ahi tuna (or grilled shrimp) to appeal to seafood-lovers. The slaw combines red cabbage and Napa cabbage, along with scallions, red pepper, cilantro and shredded carrots.  Make the dressing in a blender, with white miso, silken tofu, ponzu sauce, garlic, chili paste, water, soy sauce, sesame oil and ginger.

May is also National Barbecue Month—the ideal opportunity for exploring the flavor and texture of tempeh, combined with spring greens and salad dressings that incorporate barbecue sauce. Barbecue-marinated tempeh (fermented soybean cake) adds a nutty flavor to salads. Tempeh can be grilled, fried or sautéed. One serving offers approximately grams of protein and 7 grams of dietary fiber.

For complete salad recipes, easy salad dressing ideas, and cooking tips for soyfoods, visit The Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Ankeny, Iowa, April 22, 2019 — May is National Salad Month, but salad season extends into late spring, full summer and the fall harvest season. When you’re entertaining, you know it’s likely you’ll be preparing food for omnivores as well as flexitarians (those who gravitate to vegetarian diets but occasionally eat fish or meat). To make your life easier, remember that soy ingredients—versatile plant proteins with healthy fats and no cholesterol—provide something for everybody. This salad season, the Soyfoods Council offers a selection of crowd-pleasing ideas. Protein-rich ingredients such as tofu and tempeh can be combined with meats, seafood or chicken, while edamame can add fresh, colorful protein to seasonal salads.

To make salads with wide appeal, start with soyfood-based ideas that can be customized. Depending on preferences, you can add meat, seafood or dairy ingredients to the basic salad. Here are some examples that will appeal to flexitarians and omnivores alike.

1. Edamame and Walnut Salad is a colorful plant protein combination that pairs well with grilled pork or beef. Salad ingredients include shelled cooked edamame, toasted walnut halves, and peeled, sectioned oranges. The dressing combines Dijon mustard, extra virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and a bit of brown sugar and black pepper.

2. Edamame Salad with Tofu Croutons and Raspberry Vinaigrette is an excellent base for salads with chicken. For those who choose to stick with plant protein, this salad offers a double-whammy of soy protein, along with soybean oil—another heart healthy ingredient—in the dressing. In 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration formally recognized the cholesterol-lowering properties of soybean oil.

To make tofu croutons you’ll need cubes of water-packed extra-firm tofu, soy sauce, water, and 2 Tablespoons of ranch dressing seasoning mix. The croutons are first marinated in the seasonings, then dipped in soybean oil and tossed with cornstarch before frying. You can make them in an air fryer without having to add additional oil. Tofu croutons can also dress up Caesar Salads.

3. Creamy Miso Slaw with Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna is a blend of Asian flavors. Soyfoods meet seafood in this salad that’s bursting with cruciferous vegetables. Enjoy the slaw alone, or add ahi tuna (or grilled shrimp) to appeal to seafood-lovers. The slaw combines red cabbage and Napa cabbage, along with scallions, red pepper, cilantro and shredded carrots. Make the dressing in a blender, with white miso, silken tofu, ponzu sauce, garlic, chili paste, water, soy sauce, sesame oil and ginger.

May is also National Barbecue Month—the ideal opportunity for exploring the flavor and texture of tempeh, combined with spring greens and salad dressings that incorporate barbecue sauce. Barbecue-marinated tempeh (fermented soybean cake) adds a nutty flavor to salads. Tempeh can be grilled, fried or sautéed. One serving offers approximately grams of protein and 7 grams of dietary fiber.

For complete salad recipes, easy salad dressing ideas, and cooking tips for soyfoods, visit The Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods. Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries. In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties. Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat. In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer. All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Ankeny, Iowa, April 8, 2019—Soyfoods are for everyone—men, women, adolescents, children, seniors, the health-conscious and those who have dietary restrictions. As Americans move toward more plant-based and flexitarian diets, soyfoods make sense. In observation of National Soyfoods Month in April, The Soyfoods Council is sharing reasons why soyfoods have evolved from a traditional food in authentic Asian cuisines to trendy ingredients in the U.S.

Soyfoods are a cholesterol-free choice, adding heart-healthy fats to the diet and versatility to the menu. According to Hexa Research, the U.S. soyfoods market in 2017 was estimated to be $5.12 billion and is projected to reach $8.07 billion by 2025. Soyfoods are contemporary ingredients that are in sync with current food trends in the U.S. Nearly all of the fats in soy are a mix of polyunsaturated fat and monounsaturated fat that can lower blood cholesterol levels. Soybeans are also one of the few good sources of both essential fatty acids — omega-6 and omega-3. In addition, there is evidence indicating that soyfoods reduce the risk of several chronic diseases. Best of all, though, soyfoods are simple to incorporate into your favorite recipes.

1. Traditional soyfoods take on a contemporary twist. The rise of global cuisines has brought with it an appreciation for classic ingredients. A. Elizabeth Sloan, Ph.D., notes, “Classic Asian soy-based meat alternatives, such as tempeh and tofu, are being contemporized on menus around the world.” Sloan is president of Sloan Trends, the Escondido, California-based firm that tracks consumer food and beverage trends and behaviors as well as health and nutrition attitudes.

On its website, The Soyfoods Council offers simple ways to incorporate more soy into your diet. Suggestions include ways to tweak your favorite recipes with ingredients such as tofu.

2. Soy is a natural choice for plant-based eating. Sloan says that plant-based product claims on new food and beverage product introductions increased by 62 percent from 2013 to 2017. Soyfood choices range from soymilk and canned soybeans to edamame (fresh green soybeans) and TSP (Textured Soy Protein, also called TVP or Vegetable Protein). All these options offer convenient, economical ways to ease into plant-based eating. Not only does soy offer a variety of entrée options, it also can be incorporated into everything from soymilk maple lattes to creamy salad dressings, robust dips, soynut snacks, and chocolaty desserts.

Traditionally, tofu and tempeh have provided versatile, high-quality protein in Asian cuisine. In North America, tempeh consumption is expected to experience a significant increase as more health-conscious consumers discover how well its nutty flavor and firm texture work in everything from sandwiches to stir fry dishes. One serving of tempeh can provide 20 grams of protein and 9 grams of dietary fiber.

3. Soy is a star in the rise of meat alternatives. Not only is soy a meat alternative for those who choose to limit their meat consumption, it’s also a complement to meat. For example, to cut down on the amount of ground beef in your favorite recipes without sacrificing flavor or texture, try using a half-and-half mixture of ground beef and TSP. Shelf-stable TSP granules are a fiber-rich, zero-fat food that offers approximately 11 grams of soy protein per ¼ cup serving. Or, use TSP in your favorite chili and pasta sauce recipes.

In addition to the rise of tempeh (fermented soybean cake, popular in Indonesian cuisine), tofu is gaining popularity. The global tofu market is expected to reach $24 billion by 2022. An increase in tofu sales in the U.S. also is expected, because of more consumers seeking meat alternatives.

Visit The Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com for tofu recipes such as Easy Stuffed Shells with pasta sauce. The shells are filled with a mixture of silken tofu, one egg, shredded cheese and chopped fresh parsley. One half-cup serving of tofu provides 11 grams of protein.

4. Soy appeals to protein-seekers and fitness-conscious consumers. Sloan says that more than half of the adults in the U.S. fit into a new active lifestyle demographic of those who exercise more than three days a week for at least 30 minutes. “The high protein trend will continue to fuel interest in high protein food, drinks and supplements for years to come,” she adds.

The Soyfoods Council shares suggestions for several high-energy snacks that provide a protein boost, including ¼ cup of soynuts (whole soybeans that have been soaked in water, then baked until brown), and ½ cup of edamame steamed in the pod. Both offer 11 grams of protein per serving.

Recipe ideas from The Soyfoods Council include a variety of global cuisine influences, including the Mediterranean-inspired Tempeh and Edamame Pizza. The pizza crust incorporates protein-rich soy flour, and the toppings include cubed tempeh that has been marinated in soy sauce, garlic and ginger and then stir-fried until it’s crispy. The other toppings on the pizza are a mix of edamame, green olives, green peppers, mushrooms and shredded cheeses.

Visit www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com for complete recipes, nutrition details, updates on the latest research, and tips for cooking with soy.

About The Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods. Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries. In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties. Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat. In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer. All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Ankeny, Iowa, March 26, 2019—The Soyfoods Council provides reasons why soyfoods are the plant protein of choice for foodservice operators, but here’s our short version: Tofu, tempeh, TSP, edamame, soymilk and soy flour. Foodservice operators can choose from numerous soyfoods, but these are perhaps the most popular ingredients for industry professionals because they are readily available, economical, versatile and simple to add to recipes.

  • Tofu adds protein to your signature recipes and easily takes on the flavor of sauces, marinades and seasonings. Quite simply, tofu is made of pressed soymilk curds with nigari (seawater minerals that thicken soy curds to create tofu’s custardy texture).

  • Tempeh, a traditional ingredient in Indonesian cuisine, is gathering momentum on American menus, too. Several commercially available brands of tempeh (fermented soybean cake) have just three ingredients: organic soybeans, water and organic rice. Add tempeh to rice bowls, pasta sauce or curry sauces. Marinated tempeh, with its nutty flavor, can be grilled or sautéed for entrees and sandwiches.

  • Textured Soy Protein (TSP) granules—also called Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP)— are a fiber-rich, zero-fat food. TSP offers approximately 11 g of soy protein per ¼ cup serving. TSP granules are inexpensive, shelf-stable and widely available. Sprinkle TSP into pasta sauces in place of sausage, make chili or tacos with it, or season and add it to baked fruit desserts as a crumb topping.

  • Soy flour is made from defatted and lightly toasted soy flakes, containing an average of 50 percent protein (compared to the 15 percent protein in high protein wheat flour). To bake with soy flour, replace up to 40 percent of the wheat flour in a recipe with soy flour. Add plant protein to your standard recipes for muffins, quick breads, cookies or brownies.

  • Edamame (fresh green soybeans) in the pod are ideal for snacks and bar food, while shelled edamame add plant protein to salads and stir fry dishes. Appetizers such as Edamame Hummus are an ideal choice for all-day snack menus, too.

  • Soymilk provides an average of 7 to 8 grams of protein per serving, about the same amount found in 2% reduced fat milk. Soymilk is cholesterol free, and available in flavors.

Consider these details about the advantages of soyfoods for your menu.

Food Cost Friendly: Soy is an economical plant protein choice, offering minimally processed whole bean ingredients such as tofu, edamame and tempeh, as well as a variety of products ranging from veggie burgers to pasta. Soyfoods are unique among legumes because they are low in carbohydrates and higher in protein and fat, offering nutrition benefits that customers want. For example, the fat provided by soybeans is especially heart-healthy. Tofu offers approximately 10 grams of protein per serving, while tempeh can contain more than 16 grams of protein and 7 grams of dietary fiber.

Don’t just take our word for it: Do a food cost comparison to see how budget-friendly soyfoods such as tempeh, TSP and soy flour stack up against the alternatives.

Recipe Friendly: Without altering the flavor, texture or appearance of your signature menu items, you can easily adapt them for vegetarian, vegan or other diets with versatile soyfoods. Depending on the texture you want, tofu varieties make it easy to tweak everything from vegetable dips to soups, salad dressings and mashed potatoes. Choose from silken tofu, ideal for dessert applications, or firm water-packed varieties for stir-fry or stuffed pasta dishes like Easy Stuffed Shells filled with a mixture of silken tofu and cheese.

Don’t just take our word for it: Compare the available soyfoods choices to other plant protein options. Evaluate the simplicity of tweaking your recipes with soy to appeal to patrons who are looking for plant-based menu items.

Authentic: Soyfoods have been a plant-based dietary staple in much of the world for thousands of years. Today, tempeh and tofu are ideal for adding to rice bowls, fajitas or sandwiches. Edamame is easy to incorporate into fresh vegetable offerings or spring rolls. Or, create your own specialties, such as Tempeh and Edamame Pizza.

Don’t just take our word for it: Draw inspiration for new plant protein entrees for your menu from traditional Indonesian, Chinese and Japanese recipes. Then, add your own spin.

A Viable Dairy Alternative: Among plant-based milks, soymilk is the nutrition star, specifically mentioned in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: “Soy beverages fortified with calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin D, are included as part of the dairy group because they are similar to milk, based on nutrient composition and in their use in meals.” Not all plant-based or nondairy milk products contain the same amount of protein as dairy milk, and some have as little as 1 gram of protein per serving, or none at all. Soymilk is a handy food and beverage ingredient. It adds a burst of protein to coffee specialty drinks, dairy-free hot chocolate, and smoothies. It also creates customer-pleasing sauces and soups.

Don’t just take our word for it: To see how soymilk stacks up nutritionally when compared with other nondairy milks, just read the nutrition information on the label.

Supported by Research: The science is there to support soy as the preferred plant protein of choice. Soy ingredients such as tempeh are high-fiber, minimally processed and cholesterol-free, adding heart-healthy fats to the diet. In fact, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration formally recognized the cholesterol-lowering properties of soybean oil in 2017. Soybeans are also one of the few good sources of both essential fatty acids — omega-6 and omega-3. Nearly all of the fats in soy are a mix of polyunsaturated fat and monounsaturated fat that can lower blood cholesterol levels. There is also evidence indicating that soyfoods reduce the risk of several chronic diseases.

Don’t just take our word for it: To verify the research-based health and nutrition benefits of soyfoods, visit the Soyfoods Council website: www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.

For detailed cooking and baking tips as well as foodservice recipe ideas featuring soyfoods, visit The Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods. Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries. In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties. Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat. In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer. All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Ankeny, IA February 8, 2019—Since ancient times, women across nations and cultures have looked for botanical skin care treatments to reduce the effects of aging. According to traditional Chinese folklore, women working in the tofu industry had the most beautiful skin. Today, many women—and men—desire youthful-looking skin and are looking for ways, including diet, to lessen the visible effects of aging.

Worldwide sales in the cosmetics industry are estimated to be over $500 billion annually (USD), with skin care products accounting for the largest segment of sales. Now it appears that the benefits of soy go beyond the well-recognized moisturizing and topical applications. Although more research is needed, the existing evidence strongly suggests that the isoflavones in soy may be an important ingredient for combating the effects of skin aging, including alleviating wrinkles.

The notion that eating soyfoods can improve skin health aligns with the increasing attention being paid to how the food we eat affects our skin—it is the beauty within concept. That diet affects skin health isn’t surprising given the impact diet has on overall health.

Clinical evidence increasingly supports the notion that isoflavones favorably impact skin. Soyfoods are uniquely-rich sources of these naturally occurring compounds. One study supporting the benefits of isoflavones, which was published in the International Journal of Cosmetic Science, found a statistically significant reduction in wrinkles in postmenopausal women in response to an active treatment that included just 25 mg of isoflavones—an amount provided by approximately one serving of traditional soyfoods. This amount is well within the range consumed by older people in Japan—and is an amount that can easily be incorporated into the diet.

It has been observed that wrinkling in Asians is not noticeable until age 50, and that even then its degree is not as marked as in the Caucasian population. Now those observations are bolstered by science. The aforementioned randomized double-blind study showed that isoflavones, when part of a beverage of bioactive ingredients, lead to a reduction in wrinkles in postmenopausal women.

In this 14-week study, women were assigned to one of three groups—a control group, or one of two groups receiving a beverage containing a mixture of bioactive compounds including isoflavones. Results show that the two test groups experienced a reduction in the severity of skin roughness compared with the placebo group. Especially noteworthy is that there was a change in the parameter considered the primary indicator of wrinkle depth. The average wrinkle reduction was 10 percent, and there was a positive correlation between baseline wrinkles and the response to the active beverage. That is, the greater the wrinkle depth at baseline, the greater the improvement.

More recently, Japanese researchers enrolled postmenopausal women into an 8-week study to determine whether fermented soymilk or regular soymilk improved skin health. This is notable because it assessed both subject and objective skin changes. The women filled out facial skin questionnaires three times—at the beginning of the study, eight weeks after consuming the soymilk, and four weeks after they were no longer consuming soy—answering questions about the condition of their facial skin. Questions covered dryness, elasticity, moisture, coarseness, pigmentation, and overall satisfaction. Also, at the beginning and end of the study, samples were also taken of skin underneath the forearm from each study participant.

After eight weeks of drinking either type of soymilk, the results showed that for all six questions, the condition of the skin significantly improved. Furthermore, the skin samples taken from underneath the forearm also were consistent with the improvements reported by the women themselves. After four weeks of abstaining from soymilk, questionnaires indicated that most of the benefits were lost. That is, the condition of the skin approached the condition at the beginning of the study.

The Soyfoods Council publicizes soy-related research and highlights the work of experts conducting studies on the health effects of eating soyfoods. Interest in the effects of isoflavones on overall skin health is not surprising, given that isoflavones bind to estrogen receptors, which are present in the skin. Estrogen therapy is thought to improve skin elasticity, water-holding capacity, pigmentation and vascularity. Estrogens also influence hair follicles.

Mark Messina, PhD, MS, Executive Director of the Soy Nutrition Institute points out that several questions regarding isoflavones and skin health still need to be addressed. “At what point does the reduction in wrinkles in response to isoflavones plateau? And, will long-term use permanently slow the development of wrinkles that normally accompanies aging? The answers to these questions will help solidify the precise role of isoflavones and soyfoods on aging skin.” Meanwhile, when considering the totality of the clinical evidence, a strong case can be made that isoflavones are important contributors to skin health.

About The Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods. Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries. In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties. Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat. In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer. All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Ankeny, Iowa, January 29, 2019—Soyfoods and the Mediterranean Diet go together like, well, tempeh and olives, or lightly salted soynuts and cheese. When U.S. News recently convened a panel of experts to rate diets, the Mediterranean Diet emerged as their 2019 choice for the #1 Best Diet Overall. Consider the ways that soyfoods fit into this healthy eating plan that is focused on plant-based foods. The Mediterranean Diet incorporates more legumes, nuts, fruits and vegetables, and whole grains into your diet. When you replace saturated fats with healthy unsaturated fats to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, soyfoods are right there with you. Soyfoods provide high-quality protein, are low in saturated fat and high in polyunsaturated fat, and are one of the few good sources of both essential fatty acids. Soyfoods offer approximately seven to fifteen grams of high-quality plant protein per serving.

​Convenient soyfoods include: protein-rich soymilk; tempeh (a high fiber and high protein fermented soybean cake, ideal for sandwiches and appetizers); edamame to add protein to salads and vegetable dishes; and high fiber canned soybeans for soups and stews. Other ingredients include Textured Soy Protein (TSP) or Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP), shelf-stable high protein granules made of defatted soy flour.  Tofu is available in several forms and textures, making it ideal for a variety of applications ranging from smoothies and sauces, soups, dips, salad dressings and desserts. Stir silken tofu into polenta or mashed potatoes to add a creaminess and protein.

​How can you incorporate versatile soyfoods into The Mediterranean Diet?  Let us count the ways:

​1. Soy-ize your family’s favorite recipes without giving up all those Mediterranean foods and flavors you love. Replace half of the ground turkey, beef or chicken in recipes by replacing it with (TSP) that provides protein without adding saturated fat or cholesterol. This economical ingredient provides a protein boost to canned soups and your favorite pasta sauce recipes. There’s no need to rehydrate it; when you add it to the pot, it will absorb liquid.

​For new Mediterranean-inspired main courses, visit The Soyfoods Council website. You’ll find ideas like Tempeh and Edamame Pizza with a crust that incorporates soy flour. The pizza protein features crispy stir-fried cubed tempeh that has been marinated in a soy-garlic-ginger-soybean oil sauce. After adding pizza sauce, sprinkle with toppings such as edamame, mushrooms, green pepper, green olives and shredded mozzarella and provolone cheeses. Other soy-rich Mediterranean recipes range from Soy Italiano Spinach Pasta Rolls with Soy Protein (TSP) Marinara Sauce to Easy Stuffed Shells that you can make in an electric pressure cooker or multi cooker. The stuffed shells are filled with mashed soft silken tofu, shredded cheese, an egg or egg substitute and fresh parsley.

​2. Turn to soyfoods to add a natural complement to the clean eating and simple ingredients found in the Mediterranean Diet. Pair extra firm smoked tofu cubes and feta with an assortment of olives on your antipasto plates. Create silken tofu-based salad dressings for fresh vegetable salads. To make Creamy Roasted Red Pepper Vinaigrette, blend together soft silken tofu, chopped roasted red peppers, minced garlic, freshly squeezed lemon juice, smoked paprika and soybean oil; season with salt and pepper. Other salad ideas include Edamame with Dried Cranberries, Feta and Basil, drizzled with a touch of olive oil and a bit of freshly ground black pepper.

3. If you’re looking for flexitarian friendly foods, say hello to soy. The blend of flexible and vegetarian eating is a diet of moderation and modification. Drink soymilk lattes or heat chocolate soymilk for a quick hot chocolate. Try adding equal amounts of TVP/TSP to ground beef, pork chicken or turkey before you make meatballs or meat sauce. To create more healthful salad dressings and dips for fresh vegetables, start with silken tofu. To make Tofu Ranch Dressing, for example, add a drained package of silken tofu to a food processor or blender with 5 Tbsp. soybean oil, 2 Tbsp. lemon juice, 1 tsp. garlic powder, 1 tsp. parsley, 1 tsp. onion powder, 1 tsp. black pepper and 2 tsp. salt (or to taste). Blend, and add a little water if the dip consistency is too thick.

​4. Enjoy more sweet endings to your meals with desserts featuring soyfoods. The Soyfoods Council offers recipes such as Spiced Fruit Dip and Tiramisu Shots.  For a fresh spin on tiramisu, create small desserts featuring firm silken tofu, brewed espresso, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla sponge cake. The dessert is finished with a dusting of cocoa powder and a garnish of chocolate-covered espresso beans.  For a simple Mediterranean-style dessert of fruits like pears, figs or grapes, make Spiced Fruit Dip. In a blender, combine firm silken tofu, brown sugar, cinnamon and vanilla extract. Chill before serving with fresh fruit.

​To learn more about soyfoods in general and the ingredients that can easily tweak your favorite recipes, visit The Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com. You’ll also find diet and health information, soy cooking tips, and detailed soy-based recipes for food and drinks your whole family will love. 

Ankeny, Iowa, January 4, 2019—Keep enjoying soyfoods! With the rise of plant protein and meat alternatives, healthful eating, and dairy-free diets, soyfoods are poised to be one of the food stars of 2019. If your own eating preferences are driven by any of the following food trends, you’ll want to know the following about soyfoods.

Soyfoods are healthy, easy-to-incorporate ingredients for batch cooking and meal prepping. You can simplify your busy lifestyle by keeping versatile, lean soy protein on hand in your pantry, refrigerator and freezer. Choose from frozen edamame, refrigerated water-packed tofu, or shelf-stable TSP (textured soy protein). For example, you can prepare ready-to-add protein in advance by combining ground beef with TSP, then browning the meat mixture and freezing it in zip lock freezer bags. That way, you’ll have it on hand to add to batches of chili, pasta sauce, or lasagna.

Soyfoods make it easy to control portion sizes, too. Package ground meat/TSP crumbles or cubed tofu for cooking healthy single meals. TSP is a fiber-rich, zero fat food that offers approximately 11 grams of protein per ¼ cup serving. A 3-ounce serving of firm tofu is about 70 calories, offering approximately 8 grams of protein with no saturated fat.

Soy is the plant protein of choice. It is the only plant protein equivalent to meat. Soyfoods are high-quality plant protein, and provide all of the essential amino acids in the amounts needed for health, without the large amount of saturated fat that typically comes with animal sources of protein. One serving of soy—such as soymilk, soy nuts, edamame or tofu—offers approximately 7 to 15 grams of plant protein.

Soy is your go-to plant-based milk if you’re going dairy-free. One cup of soymilk is a nutrition powerhouse, providing approximately 8 grams of plant protein. According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, soy beverages like soymilk — fortified with calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin D— are included as part of the dairy group because they are similar to milk in nutrient composition and use. Doing dairy-free is easy with soymilk, soy yogurt and soy versions of sour cream, ice cream, cream cheese, coffee creamer and more.

Soyfoods make it simple to create better-for-you versions of favorite recipes. Healthful eating is easier with soyfoods. Ingredients such as tofu, edamame, TSP, and soymilk are low in saturated fat, and none of them contain cholesterol. Soy-ize family favorites by replacing up to 40 percent of the wheat flour with soy flour in cookie and brownie recipes, or making dips and dressings with silken tofu in place of sour cream or mayonnaise. Start the day off right by adding TSP to oatmeal, or making smoothies with vanilla soymilk, frozen berries and honey. Enjoy steamed edamame in the pod as a protein snack, or sprinkle shelled edamame into salads or stir-fry dishes to add plant protein.

Ankeny, Iowa, November 9, 2018—This year, discover how easy it is to eat healthfully, yet luxuriously, during the holidays with soyfoods. Soy is a plant protein that provides all the essential amino acids, with a protein quality that is comparable to animal protein. Soyfoods such as soy flour and soymilk also have the advantage of being low in saturated fat and contain no cholesterol.

            Soymilk makes it simple to create warm, welcoming beverages during the holidays, with regular, vanilla or chocolate soymilk. One cup of soymilk is a nutrition powerhouse, providing approximately 8 grams of plant protein. According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, soy beverages like soymilk — fortified with calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin D— are included as part of the dairy group because they are similar to milk in nutrient composition and use.

            Baking with soy flour adds plant protein to your favorite holiday cookie recipes. Soy flour, made from defatted and lightly toasted soy flakes, contains an average of 50 percent protein. By contrast, high protein wheat flour contains 15 percent protein. Because soy flour does not contain gluten, which is necessary for dough elasticity, it should be combined with wheat flour for baking cookies. (For gluten-free baking tips, visit The Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.)

            You can replace up to 40 percent of the wheat flour in a recipe with soy flour. Proportions will vary, depending on the desired texture of the finished product. For example, recipes might call for equal amounts of soy flour and wheat flour, ¼ cup or ½ cup soy flour to 1 cup of wheat flour, or ½ cup soy flour to 1½ cups wheat flour. The Soyfoods Council offers the following two cookie recipe ideas, paired with holiday-worthy drinks to complement them.

            Toffee Bars: You might have to hide these bar cookies from your family until it’s time to serve them. They are made with protein-rich soy flour, and layered with rich flavors and textures. Toffee bars are made by spreading toffee over cookie dough that is baked and then topped with melted milk chocolate and a sprinkling of chopped soy nuts. To make the dough, combine ½ cup soy flour with 1½ cups wheat flour. Serve toffee bars with kid-friendly soymilk hot chocolate.

            Luxurious Soymilk Hot Chocolate: Make this rich but simple hot chocolate in a small pan on the stovetop, or in a microwave-safe bowl. Melt a 1.5 oz. milk chocolate or dark chocolate candy bar in enough vanilla soymilk to fill a mug.

            Busy day alternative: On truly busy days, especially snowy ones where children are playing outside, make a quick but festive warm chocolate drink by heating chocolate soymilk in the microwave. Serve warmed chocolate soymilk in a mug garnished with a candy cane.

            Holiday Apricot Oatmeal Cookies: These cookies are ideal for seasonal celebrations. They’re a break from the usual cookie tray selections, too. Filled with dried cranberries, chopped dried apricots, coconut, slivered almonds, oatmeal and Textured Soy Protein (TSP), apricot oatmeal cookies are like the pastry version of an energy bar. The recipe calls for a mixture of ½ cup of soy flour and 1 cup of wheat flour. Pair these cookies with soymilk-rich eggnog.

            Soymilk Eggnog: This no-cook and no-egg spin on the classic holiday drink is made in a blender. Combine extra-firm silken tofu, soymilk, honey, water and vanilla extract with ice cubes. Flavor this rich beverage with rum, brandy, or apple juice with rum flavoring added. Garnish with a sprinkle of nutmeg and you’re ready to celebrate.

            Busy day alternative: Keep ready-made soy eggnog on hand to serve to last-minute guests. It is available in cartons, sold in the dairy section of your supermarket.

Find recipes for these easy cookies and drinks on The Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com. You’ll also find more tips for cooking with soy flour, recipes for holiday entertaining, and information about the health benefits of eating soyfoods.

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Ankeny, Iowa, March 22, 2018—The Soyfoods Council knows that Instant Pots are among the hottest cooking trends today—both for the convenience factor in cooking healthful ingredients such as soyfoods and other legumes, and for retaining nutrients. That’s because Instant Pot cooking requires shorter cooking times that preserve vitamins and minerals in foods. With the current interest in adding more plant proteins to our diets, The Definitive Guide to Cooking Soyfoods in the Instant Pot makes perfect sense. It simplifies the process of quickly preparing ingredients such as tempeh, frozen edamame, TVP / TSP (textured vegetable protein / textured soy protein), canned or dried soybeans and other popular soyfoods. The chart also provides cooking times and guidelines for making your own soy yogurt or tempeh in an Instant Pot.

In addition to the new chart, The Soyfoods Council offers detailed instructions, recipes and Instant Pot meal ideas on its website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com/Instantpot. You’ll find convenient one-pot meals like the Tempeh Rice Bowl. To make it in an Instant Pot, sauté diced onion and carrot in sesame oil for about 3 minutes. Mix in white miso, and then add tempeh and sauté for another 8 minutes before adding brown rice and water. Cook under high pressure for about 22 minutes and allow for a natural release. To finish, remove the lid and stir in leafy greens such as baby spinach or Swiss chard just until they wilt. Serve the Tempeh Rice Bowl with a garnish of crushed peanuts and a dash of tamari or soy sauce. Look for the complete recipe on The Soyfoods Council website.

            Soyfoods are affordable, readily available ingredients. One serving of soy provides approximately 7 to 15 grams of high-quality plant protein. Soyfoods also offer all eight of the essential amino acids needed for healthy growth, without the large amount of saturated fat that typically comes with animal sources of protein.

When you visit the Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com, you’ll find soy nutrition information and the latest research about the health benefits of soyfoods.

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About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

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