Read the Nutrition Labels on Soyfoods to Separate Chatter from Knowledge

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: 

Linda Funk

Executive Director

The Soyfoods Council

515.491.8636

lfunk@thesoyfoodscouncil.com

Photos Available Upon Request

Ankeny, Iowa, February 25, 2020 —During National Nutrition Month in March, educate yourself by comparing labels on plant-based milks and plant protein products. When you do, be prepared to discover why soyfoods help you satisfy your cravings as well as your nutrition goals. With its health attributes, protein quality and a large number of versatile products available, soy protein is the preferred plant protein.

Traditional soyfoods are popular in many of the world’s cuisines for a good reason. Tofu, tempeh, and edamame are minimally processed plant proteins that offer 7 to 15 grams of protein per serving. For example, a half-cup serving of tofu has 10 grams of protein, and a half-cup of tempeh supplies 15 grams of protein.

Soyfoods meet your dietary needs with complete plant proteins. Did you know that tofu, tempeh and edamame are complete, cholesterol-free complete plant proteins that contain all the essential amino acids in amounts needed by the body? The soybean is higher in protein than other beans, too (~35% vs. ~27%).  Canned soybeans are easy to incorporate into recipes such as chili or soups. By simply adding a cup of thawed edamame (shelled, frozen   green soybeans) to pasta or salad recipes, you’re punching up the nutrition content with 17 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber. 

Soyfoods meet your meal-planning objectives. If you’re looking for meal ideas to please omnivores, flexitarians and vegetarians alike, you will find that soyfoods simplify the task. Ingredients such as textured soy protein (also called TSP) boast a neutral flavor that blends well with other ingredients such as ground meat. TSP comes in the form of shelf-stable granules made of defatted soy flour. A quarter-cup serving contains about 12 grams of protein. TSP has the advantage of absorbing the flavor of seasonings or other ingredients, and adds a familiar meat-like texture to entrees like vegetarian tacos and chili. Tofu is another versatile choice that creates dairy-free sauces, dips and desserts such as chocolate tofu mousse. It makes a great filling for lasagna or stuffed shells, and creates creamy, satisfying soups. 

Soymilk is a nondairy star. When choosing a plant-based milk, look for the nutrition content on product labels. According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, “Soy beverages fortified with calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin D, are included as part of the dairy group because they are similar to milk, based on nutrient composition and in their use in meals.” Fortified soymilk brands offer about 8 grams of protein per serving and as much calcium as dairy milk—30 to 40 percent of your daily calcium needs in just one serving. 

Find recipes, nutrition and health information on the Soyfoods Council website: www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.

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About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties. Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Media Contact:
Linda Funk
Executive Director
The Soyfoods Council
515.491.8636
lfunk@thesoyfoodscouncil.com
 
Photos Available Upon Request

Ankeny, Iowa, November 11, 2019 —When your family and friends gather around the table for holiday meals, soyfoods help you create a menu that offers something for everyone—omnivores, vegetarians and foodies alike. Crowd-pleasing recipe suggestions from The Soyfoods Council can easily be adapted to various eating styles, and offer a blend of trend and tradition. And, because this is the season to treat yourself, too, the recipes can simplify your life and minimize your time in the kitchen.

Ingredients such as tofu, edamame and soymilk are complete, cholesterol-free plant proteins that contain all the essential amino acids in amounts needed by the body. A one-cup serving of soymilk provides an average of 7 to 8 grams of protein, while a half-cup serving of tofu can provide 10 grams of protein. Fermented soyfoods such as tempeh and miso add flavor as well as probiotics to your recipes. So, in a sense, you’re giving a gift of more healthful eating when you cook with soyfoods.

• Tofu lightens your holiday menu: Take traditional foods to the next level with silken tofu. Tofu can reduce the amount of saturated fat in recipes by replacing all or part of the sour cream, cream cheese or heavy cream in soups, vegetable dips, pasta dishes and desserts. On the Soyfoods Council website you’ll also find cholesterol-free spins on traditional desserts like Tofu Chocolate Mousse and Tofu Pumpkin Pie.

• Edamame elevates side dishes to entrees. When you add edamame (fresh green soybeans) to pasta salads or vegetable blends, you are adding high-quality plant protein to your holiday menu. You can blend edamame with avocado to make a high protein guacamole dip, too.

• Miso is made for meats, mushrooms, mayonnaise, mashed potatoes and more. Savory miso paste, a staple ingredient in Japan, is made by fermenting soybeans with rice, barley or other grains to add a note of umami to foods. Miso is a high-protein plant-based food with 2 grams of protein per tablespoon and also contains probiotics that aid the digestive system. Stir miso into meatless dishes such as mashed potatoes or sautéed mushrooms, use it in marinades for salmon and meats, combine it with mayonnaise as a sandwich spread, use it to make salad dressings, or add it to sauces for tofu, chicken, beef and roasted vegetables.

• Soymilk caters to guests who choose dairy-free diets. When it comes to holiday beverages, everyone appreciates eggnog—whether it’s spiked or not—and hot chocolate served with a cinnamon stick or candy cane garnish. Simply substitute plain or vanilla soymilk for dairy milk in your favorite beverage recipes, including steamy coffee drinks made with or without a splash of spirits.

For holiday ideas from The Soyfoods Council, visit www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com. You’ll find recipes for everything from appetizers to desserts, plus nutrition information, cooking tips, and recent research concerning soyfoods and your health.

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties. Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Media Contact:
Linda Funk
Executive Director
The Soyfoods Council
515.491.8636
lfunk@thesoyfoodscouncil.com
 
Photos Available Upon Request

Ankeny, Iowa, October 22, 2019 —We know that when you’re baking pumpkin pies, creating rich cakes or rolling out the dough for your favorite holiday cookies you’re thinking about seasonal indulgences rather than good nutrition. But what if you could do both? In fact, you can.

The Soyfoods Council offers baking tips and recipe tweaks that focus on healthier holiday fare as well as celebration-worthy recipe ideas. After all, this is the season to treat yourself, too—by simplifying your life and minimizing your time in the kitchen. Ingredients such as tofu, soynuts, soy flour and TSP (Textured Soy Protein, also called TVP or Textured Vegetable Protein) are complete plant proteins that contain all the essential amino acids in amounts needed by the body.

• Add a little plant protein to the party.  Keep protein ingredients such as silken tofu and soynuts in mind as you look for recipes can also reduce the amount of saturated fat by replacing some of the rich ingredients like heavy cream with plant-based foods like silken tofu.

Consider Tofu Pumpkin Pie for a cholesterol-free version of the classic. Filling for a 9-inch unbaked pie crust combines the following: One 12-ounce box of extra firm silken tofu, a 15-ounce can of pumpkin, 2 Tablespoons of soybean oil (vegetable oil), 2 Tablespoons dark molasses, ¾ cup granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon, and ½ teaspoon each of ground ginger, salt and vanilla extract. Finally, add ¼ teaspoon of ground nutmeg and a dash of ground cloves. Bake at 350°F for 50 minutes to 1 hour.

Tofu Fudge Drop Cookies are a quick and easy holiday cookie recipe made with silken tofu, soybean oil, cocoa powder, soymilk, vanilla extract and all-purpose flour. Form the dough into small balls, and roll them in granulated sugar before baking—and then watch them disappear.

• Put soy flour to work in your kitchen. Did you know that you can replace up to 40 percent of the wheat flour with soy flour to add protein to your favorite cookie recipes? Soy flour, made from defatted and lightly toasted soy flakes, contains an average of 50 percent protein. High protein wheat flour, by contrast, contains 15 percent protein. When wheat flour is fortified with defatted soy flour, it boosts the protein content of the finished product. For decades the professional baking industry has taken advantage of other attributes of soy flour as well. For instance, when 2 percent up to 5 percent soy flour is added to a bread dough formula, the texture, crust color and crumb structure are improved. Soy flour also serves to increase water absorption so that breads don’t get stale as quickly.

Soyfood based recipes such as Guilt-Free Brownies take a classic favorite to the next level by incorporating canned black soybeans for added protein and fiber. The recipe combines soy flour, eggs, sugar, soybean oil, cocoa powder, brewed coffee, baking powder and vanilla. The result is everything you love about brownies, with a plant protein boost.

Soy flour does not contain gluten, which makes it a good choice for gluten-free recipes. You can find baking ideas and gluten-free baking tips on The Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.  For conventional baking, gluten is necessary for dough elasticity.  To achieve the texture you’re used to in cookies and other baked goods, remember to combine soy flour with wheat flour.

You’ll find recipes like Gluten-Free Refrigerator Cookies that incorporate soy flour, baking powder, soybean oil, lemon or almond extract, sugar, water and a pinch of salt.

• Introduce Textured Soy Protein (TSP) to oatmeal. Also known as Textured Vegetable Protein, it is made from soy flour formed into small pieces about the size and shape of browned ground beef. Its texture and protein content make it an ideal complement to oatmeal in cookie and baked good recipes. TSP is a fiber-rich, zero fat food that offers approximately 11 grams of protein per ¼ cup serving. It comes in a dry form and can be stored on a cupboard shelf. In cookie recipes calling for oatmeal, use half oatmeal and half TSP to add a burst of plant protein. For baking, simply use TSP as is, without rehydrating it. It’s ideal for recipes such as fruit cobbler. For a crunch topping to keep on hand for sprinkling on fresh fruit or ice cream, combine TSP with honey and bake it for a short time.

Holiday Apricot Oatmeal Cookies combine TSP and oatmeal with dried cranberries, coconut, chopped dried apricots and slivered almonds. The cookie recipe is made with a half-cup of soy flour and 1 cup of all-purpose flour.

For more information from The Soyfoods Council, as well as holiday recipes for cookies, breads, muffins, pies and cakes visit www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com. You’ll also find nutrition information, cooking tips, and recent research concerning soyfoods and your health.

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods. Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties. Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Media Contact:
Linda Funk
Executive Director
The Soyfoods Council
515.491.8636
lfunk@thesoyfoodscouncil.com
 
Photos Available Upon Request

New Research Suggests Four More Reasons to Enjoy Soyfoods

Ankeny, Iowa, September 27, 2019 —Recently published research is good news for fans of soyfoods like tofu and tempeh, and may also inspire others to add soyfoods to their diet. After all, soyfoods are quintessential sources of plant protein.  The soybean is higher in protein than other beans (~35% vs. ~27%). Soy also is a complete plant protein, which means that it contains all the essential amino acids in amounts needed by the body.

1. Your liver and your heart may benefit when you incorporate soyfoods into your diet. Most Americans now recognize the value of reducing their intake of saturated fat, the predominant type of fat in many animal-derived foods. Saturated fat increases blood cholesterol levels and, as a result, increases the risk of heart disease. For this reason, health professionals recommend replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat which decreases blood cholesterol levels. Polyunsaturated fats are the predominant type of fat in vegetable oils such as soybean oil, as well as in soyfoods.

According to recent work by Swedish researchers published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, there may be another equally important reason to lower your intake of saturated fat. When compared to polyunsaturated fat, saturated fat increases the amount of fat in your liver.  Too much fat in your liver—unrelated to alcohol consumption—is referred to as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).  This disease is increasingly common, especially in Western nations, and can progress to cirrhosis of the liver and even liver failure.

One of the easiest ways to reduce intake of saturated fat is to replace some of the protein-rich animal foods in your diet with soyfoods. When soyfoods such as edamame and tofu replace common animal protein sources, estimates are that the direct effect of the protein in soyfoods when combined with the favorable change in the fatty acid content of the diet will reduce cholesterol levels by 7% to 8%. Making that simple switch just might benefit both your liver and heart.

2. Consuming soybean isoflavones may have a positive effect on your bone mineral density. Bone mineral density, also called bone density, refers to the amount of calcium, phosphorous and other minerals found in a segment of bone. A recent analysis of clinical studies published in the journal Nutrition Research concluded that isoflavones improve bone mineral density. Soybeans are the richest source of isoflavones. Soybean isoflavones are commonly referred to as plant estrogens or phytoestrogens, and for more 25 years they have been studied for their possible skeletal benefits.

Now, new research from the University of Texas Medical Branch has identified another way in which isoflavones may affect the bones. Researchers postulated that isoflavones help regulate blood calcium levels. Maintaining blood calcium levels within a tight range is critically important, and the body has several mechanisms designed specifically for that purpose. This new research indicates that when calcium levels are normal, isoflavones will stimulate calcium’s deposition into the bones, thereby increasing bone mineral density and decreasing risk of having a fracture. Conversely, when blood calcium levels are too low, isoflavones will draw calcium from the bones, helping to normalize blood calcium levels. Good sources of isoflavones include tofu, soynuts, edamame, soymilk and tempeh.

3. Your spine may thank you for consuming tofu and increasing your bone mineral density. Each year an estimated 1.5 million Americans suffer a fracture due to bone disease. Osteoporosis is one of the diseases associated with the postmenopausal syndrome. As women enter menopause, estrogen levels decrease, which accelerates the rate of bone breakdown and decreases the rate of bone formation. Rapid loss of bone mass leads to an increased susceptibility to bone fractures. One of the most common sites of fracture is the spine.  This knowledge makes a recent report from the Chinese researchers especially relevant.

Investigators from Xiamen University in Fujian, China, found that tofu consumption increased spinal bone mineral density. For this study, 300 postmenopausal women were assigned to one of two groups.  The first received 100 grams of dried tofu daily for two years—equivalent to the amount of isoflavones provided by about two servings of traditional soyfoods. The other group received rice cake.

After two years of supplementation, spinal bone mineral density increased by about 4% in the tofu group but decreased in the group consuming rice cake.  The difference between the two groups was highly statistically significant, indicating that the effect was unlikely to have occurred by chance. Findings from this study, published in Calcified Tissue International, suggest that tofu increases bone mineral density by decreasing the rate of bone breakdown. Tofu offers a natural and economical intervention for preventing postmenopausal osteoporosis.

4. Soyfoods can improve the health outlook for those with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome—a group of conditions that occur together—increases the risk of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. These conditions include increased blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride (a type of blood fat) levels. Research from Iran, published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome journal, shows that adding soyfoods to the diet of those who have metabolic syndrome can markedly improve their health. The three groups of participants in the study consumed roasted soybeans that provided 25 grams of protein, textured soy protein (textured soy flour) that provided 18 grams of protein, or were part of a control group that maintained their usual diet.

After 12 weeks, those in the soynuts-consuming group experienced a decrease in total- and LDL-cholesterol, in fasting blood glucose levels, fasting insulin levels, insulin resistance and an improvement in antioxidant status.  Those who consumed textured soy protein also showed improvements, although the soynuts were a bit more beneficial. Several components of soybeans likely account for the observed benefits, including the protein, isoflavones and fat. The fat in soybeans is predominantly polyunsaturated fat, which has been shown to lower cholesterol and improve insulin sensitivity. Lowering cholesterol, improving glucose control and increasing antioxidant status substantially reduces the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

For more information about the studies mentioned, as well as tempting soyfoods recipes from The Soyfoods Council, visit www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com. You’ll also find nutrition information, cooking tips, and other recent research concerning soyfoods and your health.

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

It’s Tempeh Time: Trendy Fall Plant Forward Recipe Ideas

Ankeny, Iowa, September 4, 2019 —If you’re not already enjoying meals made with tempeh, The Soyfoods Council wants to remind you of the many reasons why fall is the right time to start.  As busy back-to-school schedules converge with cooler weather and tailgate party season, many consumers are looking for simple plant protein recipes to fit their active lifestyles. Tempeh, or fermented soybean cake, is a high-quality protein that adds firm texture and nutty flavor to everything from sandwiches to main courses. It’s a complete protein, which means it offers adequate amounts of all the essential amino acids in amounts needed by the body.  One half-cup of tempeh provides 15 grams of protein, and can easily be incorporated into fajitas, pizza toppings, rice bowls and stir-fry dishes.

While tempeh is an emerging ingredient in the U.S., it has long been a protein staple in Indonesian cuisine. Tempeh is not only packed with nutrients, it contains familiar ingredients. Some commercially available tempeh brands have just three ingredients: organic soybeans, water and organic rice. With its winning combination of rich flavor, high quality protein and fiber, tempeh is a nutrition powerhouse. Dietary fiber recommendations for adults 50 years and younger are 25 grams per day for women and 38 grams per day for men. However, the average U.S. intake is approximately 15 grams, according to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. One serving of tempeh adds at least 5 grams of fiber to your diet.

Tempeh also is a fermented food, made from naturally fermented soybeans. Serve it with other fall specialties like cider, sauerkraut and pickled vegetables. Fermented foods are considered functional foods — they have potentially beneficial health effects when consumed on a regular basis at certain levels. Fermented foods such as tempeh contain probiotics (live organisms) that are intended to provide health benefits, including improving or restoring the intestinal flora to promote a healthy digestive tract. For the past two years, fermented foods have remained the number one hot superfood trend, according to the Pollock Communications Survey 2019.

For a trendy fall sandwich, create grilled Tempeh Reuben Sandwiches made with sauerkraut, packaged tempeh bacon slices from your grocery store, Swiss cheese and Russian dressing. Serve the sandwich on rye or pumpernickel bread with dill pickles, accompanied by your favorite craft beer, fresh cider or hard cider                        

            

Other hearty sandwich ideas include Tempeh Grinders served on hoagie buns. To make the sandwich filling, sauté small pieces of tempeh with onion, garlic, paprika, ground fennel seed, soy sauce, vegetable oil, red pepper and ground black pepper. Pour tomato sauce with Parmesan cheese over the tempeh mixture, topped with shredded mozzarella and hot peppers.

For casual get-togethers, The Soyfoods Council suggests globally inspired recipes like Classic Tempeh Fajitas or Tempeh Bites with Curried Peanut Sauce. For fajitas, start by simmering a mixture of pineapple juice, low-sodium soy sauce, cumin, soybean oil, and fresh lime juice. Remove marinade from heat and pour over tempeh strips. Allow the tempeh to marinate for 30 minutes to two hours. Grill onions, peppers and garlic, and then grill the tempeh strips for two minutes on each side. Serve in warm tortillas, drizzled with a bit of chipotle salsa.

For Tempeh Bites with Curried Peanut Sauce, simmer tempeh cubes for 15 minutes with rice vinegar, soy sauce, sherry, minced fresh ginger, vegetable oil and crushed garlic. To make the dipping sauce, bring a mixture of water, chopped onion, minced fresh ginger and garlic, curry powder and turmeric to a boil and cook for one minute. Cool the mixture and add it to a food processor along with peanuts and fresh lemon juice. Process until the sauce is smooth. Serve dipping sauce along with tempeh cubes on skewers.

It’s also simple to add marinated tempeh slices to your favorite pastas or casseroles. Marinate the tempeh before sautéing or grilling it. Tempeh complements a variety of pasta sauces, barbecue sauce, teriyaki sauce, peanut sauce, or Buffalo wing sauce.

If you’re looking for one more reason to enjoy tempeh as a meat alternative, remember that soyfoods are a healthful, cholesterol-free addition to the diet. When soyfoods replace common protein sources—which tend to be high in saturated fat—estimates are that the direct effect of the protein in soyfoods, along with the favorable change in the fatty acid content of the diet, can reduce cholesterol levels by 7 to 8%.

For complete versions of the tempeh recipes mentioned, as well as other ideas like Tempeh and Edamame Pizza and Tempeh Rice Bowls, visit www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com. You’ll also find tempeh cooking tips and the most recent research about soyfoods and your health.

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Ingredients

  1. 1-8 ounce package tempeh, sliced

  2. 1-8 ounce package mushrooms, sliced

  3. 1 teaspoon chopped garlic

  4. 1 small onion, sliced

  5. 4 tablespoons soybean oil, divided

  6. 1 tablespoon soy sauce

  7. 1 teaspoon Maggi® seasoning

  8. 1 teaspoon salt

  9. ¼ teaspoon pepper

  10. 4 tablespoons butter, room temperature

  11. 8 slices rye bread

  12. 8 slices Swiss cheese

  13. 4 tablespoons Thousand Island dressing

  14. ½ cup sauerkraut, warmed

YIELDS 4

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, add tempeh, mushrooms, garlic and onion, toss together.

  2. Add 2 tablespoons soybean oil, soy sauce, Maggie seasoning, salt and pepper, blend.

  3. In a medium skillet, over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons oil, heat.

  4. Add tempeh mixture.

  5. Sauté until tempeh and vegetables are slightly browned.

  6. Adjust seasoning as desired. Keep warm.

  7. Butter one side of each slice of bread.

  8. Place butter side down on a grill pan or skillet.

  9. Top 4 slices with 2 slices cheese each, cook until browned on bottom.

  10. Set aside 4 toasted slices without cheese.

  11. Add 1 tablespoon Thousand Island dressing to bread that has cheese on it.

  12. Divide tempeh mixture and sauerkraut evenly over each slice of bread with cheese and dressing.

  13. Top with remaining slices of bread with toasted side up.

  14. Slice sandwiches in half. Serve immediately.

Ingredients

Dough

  1. 1 ¾ cups whole wheat or white flour

  2. ¼ cup soy flour

  3. 1 tablespoon active dry yeast

  4. ¾ teaspoon sea salt

  5. 1 cup warm water

  6. 1 tablespoon soybean oil

  7. 1 teaspoon honey

Topping

  1. 1-8 ounce package Tempeh, cut into small cubes

  2. 6 tablespoons soy sauce

  3. 2 clove garlic, minced

  4. 2 teaspoons minced ginger

  5. 3 Bay leaves

  6. 2 tablespoons soybean oil

  7. Pizza Sauce

  8. 1 cup shelled edamame

  9. 1 cup sliced mushrooms

  10. ½ green pepper, seeded, sliced into strips

  11. ½ cup green olives

  12. 1 cup each, shredded Mozzarella and Provolone cheese

YIELDS 3

By Chef Tom Fello, Tommy’s Restaurant, Cleveland Heights, OH

Directions

Dough

  1. In a large mixing bowl, add flours, yeast, and salt, mix well.

  2. Add water, oil and honey, mix until combined.

  3. Cover bowl with moist cloth, place in warm spot for 10 minutes to rise.

Topping

  1. In a small mixing bowl add soy sauce, garlic, ginger, and bay leaves, stir to blend.

  2. Add tempeh, mix.

  3. Let marinate for 1 hour.

  4. Drain.

  5. In a small fry pan, over medium heat, add oil, heat.

  6. Add tempeh, stir fry until crispy.

  7. Place on paper town to absorb any excess oil; set aside.

  8. Press dough out onto a 14 inch pizza pan or cookie sheet.

  9. Spoon favorite pizza sauce onto dough.

  10. Sprinkle fried tempeh cubes, edamame. mushrooms, green pepper and olives onto pizza.

  11. Sprinkle shredded Mozzarella and provolone cheese over the pizza.

  12. Bake in preheated 425 F. oven for 15 to 20 minutes or until crust is browned.

  13. Cut into 6-8 pieces.

  14. Serve immediately.

Ingredients

  1. 1 teaspoon sesame oil

  2. 1/2 cup diced onion

  3. 1/2 cup diced carrot

  4. 1 tablespoon white miso

  5. 1 8-ounce package tempeh

  6. 1 cup brown rice

  7. 1 3/4 cup water

  8. 2 cups tightly packed leafy greens, such as baby spinach, Swiss chard and/or arugula

  9. Crushed peanuts, for garnish

  10. Splash of tamari or soy sauce, for serving (optional)

SERVES 4

By Recipe by JL Fields for The Soyfoods Council

Instructions

  1. Set the Instant Pot on the sauté function, using the adjust button to increase to more heat.

  2. Add the sesame oil, onion, and carrot and sauté for about three minutes.

  3. Add the miso and continue sautéing until the miso becomes creamy and mixed well with the vegetables.

  4. Add the tempeh, crumbling with your fingers as you remove it from the package.

  5. Using a spoon crumble the tempeh while sautéing. Do this for about 8 minutes.

  6. The tempeh should begin to resemble small beans (or meat crumbles).

  7. Add the brown rice and water. Turn the sauté function off.

  8. Cover the Instant Pot, move the steam valve to sealing, press manual (high pressure) and adjust the time to 22 minutes.

  9. Allow for a natural release.

  10. Remove the lid. Stir in two cups of leafy greens.

  11. Prop the lid on the top of the pot, without sealing, for just a few minutes to allow the greens to slightly wilt.

  12. Serve in a bowl with crushed peanuts and a splash of tamari or soy sauce (if using).

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